Nouns (das Nomen die Nomina) - FrauHarrill

Werbung
Grammatikunterricht
1
Nouns (das Nomen die Nomina)
der Mann, das Buch, die Familie


A noun is a person (eine Person), place (ein Ort), or thing (ein Ding).
In German, all nouns are CAPITALIZED.
Can you recognize the nouns in the following list?







das Mädchen
gehen
der Garten
kommen
die Frau
kennen
das Auto
Did you notice that German has 3 words for the when talking about the subject (nominative)
in a sentence? (der/die/das)
The der, die or das in front of the word is called the definite article. It means “the”. We refer to
these as masculine (der), feminine (die) and neuter (das). Be aware, however, that the nouns
associated with either of the three articles are not necessarily “masculine”or “feminine”or
“neuter” by context—the article for a man’s tie (die Krawatte) is feminine, while a woman’s
scarf (der Schal) is masculine.
A good general rule for learning German vocabulary is to treat the article of a noun as an
integral part of the word.
Don't just learn Garten (garden), learn der Garten.
Don't just learn Tür (door), learn die Tür.
Not knowing a word's gender can lead to all sorts of other problems:
 das Tor is the gate or portal; der Tor is the fool.
 Are you meeting someone at the lake (der See) or by the sea (die See)?
I will soon give you some hints that can help you remember the gender (der/die/das) of a German
noun.
The guidelines work for many noun categories, but certainly not for all. For most nouns you will
just have to know the gender. (If you're going to guess, guess der. The highest percentage of
German nouns are masculine.) Some of the following hints are a 100 percent sure thing, while
others have exceptions.
1. das Mädchen
4. die Ecke
7. der Freund
10. der Herr
2. der Junge
5. der Tag
8. die Mutter (=mother) 11. das Foto
3. die Frau
6. die Minute
9. die Freundin
12.der Kuli
Grammatikunterricht
German Gender Hints
Remember, always learn any new German noun with its gender (der/die/das)! But if you
happen to forget the gender, you'll find the following hints for German gender helpful...











Always MASCULINE (der/ein):
Days, months, and seasons: Montag, September, Sommer
Names of cars: der VW, der Mercedes.
Words ending in -ismus: Journalismus, Kommunismus, Multikulturalismus
Usually MASCULINE (der/ein):
Most occupations and nationalities: der Architekt, der Lehrer, der Deutsche, der Schüler
Note that the feminine form of these terms almost always ends in -in (die Architektin,
die Lehrerin, die Schülerin, but die Deutsche).
Nouns ending in -er, when referring to people (but die Mutter, die Schwester, die
Tochter, das Fenster)
Always FEMININE (die/eine):
Nouns ending in the following suffixes: -heit, -keit, -tät, -ung, -schaft - Examples: die
Freiheit, Universität, Umgebung, Freundschaft
Cardinal numbers: eine Eins, eine Drei (a one, a three)
Usually FEMININE (die/eine):
Nouns ending in -in that pertain to female people, occupations, nationalities:
Amerikanerin, Schülerin
Most nouns ending in -e: Ecke, Minute, Karte, but der Deutsche, der Junge
Nouns ending in -ei: Partei, Bäckerei (party [political], bakery),
Always NEUTER (das/ein):
 Nouns ending in -chen or -lein: Büchlein, Mädchen (booklet, girl)
Usually NEUTER (das/ein):
 Young animals and people: das Baby, das Kalb (calf); but der Junge (boy).
 Geographic place names (towns, countries, continents): das Berlin, Deutschland,
Brasilien, Afrika (exceptions: der Irak, der Jemen, die Schweiz, die Türkei, die USA
[plural])
 Nouns ending in -o: das Auto, Kasino, Radio, Video
Exceptions: die Avocado, die Disko, der Euro
2
Grammatikunterricht
3
The German Plural: die Mehrzahl
One easy aspect of German nouns is the article used for noun plurals. All German nouns,
regardless of gender, become die in the plural.


A noun such as das Jahr (year) becomes die Jahre (years) in the plural.
Sometimes the only way to recognize the plural form of a German noun is by the article:
das Fenster (window) - die Fenster (windows).
The following chart shows the dozen different ways that German nouns can form the plural
(die Mehrzahl).
Hint: Learning the noun plurals is a lot like learning gender (der/die/das). It is best to simply
learn a noun with both its gender and its plural form.
Although there are at least a dozen ways to form the plural in German, beginners should
concentrate on the first five or six of the German plural forms listed below. More advanced
learners should be aware of all of them. They are ranked here with the more common forms
first:
German Plural Formation
Plural 1
Plural 2
Plural 3
Plural 4
Add an -e: der Freund – die Freunde
Add an -en: die Minute – die Minuten
No change: das Mädchen - die Mädchen
Add an -n: die Tafel - die Tafeln
Plural 5
Plural 6
Plural 7
Plural 8
Add ¨er or -er: das Buch - die Bücher
Add an -s: das Auto - die Autos
Stem vowel adds ¨:, der Bruder - die Brüder
Add an -nen: die Freundin - die Freundinnen
Plural 9
Plural 10
Plural 11
Plural 12
Add an -se: das Erlebnis - die Erlebnisse (experience)
Add ¨e: der Plan – die Pläne
Suffix/ending changes: das Museum - die Museen
Foreign word plurals: das Prinzip – die Prinzipien (principle)
Grammatikunterricht
4
It’s all about you: du, Sie, ihr
du oder Sie?
German has 3 words for “you”. When talking to one person, you will address him or her
with du or Sie. How will you know which one to use?
Woher kommen Sie, Herr Schulz?
Wie alt bist du, Sophie?
You = du is considered to be informal or familiar. It is what one family member calls
another, an adult calls a child, or in prayers and church services. When people talk to
animals, they use du. Blue-collar workers, students, and military personnel or police
officers of equal rank use du. Young people use du to address each other. Close friends
call each other du.
You = Sie is considered to be formal, and is used among adults who are not close friends
and also as a term of respect. Students address their teacher or Lehrer(in) with Sie, as do
employees address their supervisor. When in doubt, address someone you do not know
well with Sie.
du oder ihr?
Wo wohnt ihr, Tina und Marcus?
Kennst du Maria, Marcus?
As stated above, use du when you are talking to one person you know well, to relatives,
to children or to animals. A plural form of du is ihr.
While du is only used for one person, ihr is only used for two or more people. Note that
Sie is used for adults and can be used to address one or more than one person. The
word Sie is always capitalized
Grammatikunterricht
5
Verbs: Verben
What is a verb? (Was ist ein Verb?)
Verbs are the action words in a sentence: (gehen, wohnen, sagen, singen, danken).




Each verb has a basic "infinitive" ("to") form. This is the form of the verb you find in a
German dictionary (spielen= to play, gehen= to go)
Each verb has a "stem" form, the basic part of the verb left after you remove the -en
ending. For spielen the stem is spiel- (spielen - en).
To conjugate the verb—that is, use it in a sentence—you must add the correct ending to
the stem. If you want to say "I play" you add an -e ending: "ich spiele" (which can also
be translated into English as "I am playing"). Each "person" (he, you, they, etc.) requires
its own ending on the verb. This is called "conjugating the verb."
A regular verb like spielen is conjugated in the following manner:
ich spiele
SINGULAR
I play
du spielst
you (fam.)play
er spielt
he plays
sie spielt
she plays
es spielt
it plays
PLURAL
Ich spiele
Basketball.
Spielst du
Tennis?
Er spielt
Eishockey.
Sie spielt
Gitarre.
wir spielen
we play
Wir spielen Baseball.
ihr spielt
you guys/y’all play
Spielt ihr Monopoly?
sie spielen
they play
Sie spielen Golf.
Sie spielen
you play
Spielen Sie?
(Sie, formal "you," is
both singular and
plural.)
Es spielt
keine Rolle.
It doesn't
matter.
The Present Perfect (Perfekt) Tense (past tense)
For the past tense (Present Perfect) of a regular verb, add “ge“ to the beginning of the stem and
“t“ to the end. Place it at the end of the sentence and conjugate a form of haben in its place.
Ich habe gespielt.
Du hast gespielt.
Er hat gespielt.
Sie hat gespielt.
Es hat gespielt.
I played
you (familiar)played
he played
she played
it played
Wir haben gespielt.
Ihr habt gespielt.
Sie haben gespielt.
Sie haben gespielt.
we played
you guys/y’all played
they played
you played
Grammatikunterricht
Irregular Verbs: unregelmäßige Verben
„ Sein oder Nichtsein, das ist die Frage.”
I am
ich bin
we are
wir sind
you (informal) are du bist
y’all are
ihr seid
he is/ she is/ it is
You (formal) are Sie/sie sind
they are
er/sie/es ist
Wir sind um drei Uhr zu Hause.
Ihr seid klug!
haben= to have
I have
ich habe
we have
wir haben
you (informal) have
du hast
y’all have
ihr habt
he is/ she is/ it has
er/sie/es hat
You (formal)/they have
Haben Sie Geschwister, Herr Schneider?
Er hat zwei Brüder.
werden= will (be) (future tense)
ich
werde
wir
werden
du
wirst
ihr
werdet
er/sie/es
wird
Sie/sie werden
Ich werde um drei Uhr nach Hause gehen.
Wirst du eine Cola trinken?
Sie/sie haben
6
Grammatikunterricht
Irregular Verbs: unregelmäßige Verben, contd.
wissen= to know (a fact)
Pronoun
Form
Pronoun Form
ich
weiß
wir
wissen
du
weißt
ihr
wisst
er/sie/es
weiß
Sie/sie
wissen
Helping Verbs (Modal Auxiliaries)
to be
permitted/
allowed to/
may
to be able
to/can
to like
to have
to/must
would like to
to be
supposed
to/should
to want to
dürfen
können
mögen
müssen
möchten
sollen
wollen
darf
kann
mag
muss
möchte
soll
will
du
darfst
kannst
magst
musst
möchtest
sollst
willst
wir
dürfen
können
mögen
müssen
möchten
sollen
wollen
ihr
dürft
könnt
mögt
müsst
möchtet
sollt
wollt
dürfen
können
mögen
müssen
möchten
sollen
wollen
ich
er
sie
es
Sie/sie
Darf ich zur Toilette gehen?
Magst du Bratwurst?
Können Sie Klavier spielen, Frau Weber?
7
Grammatikunterricht
8
Irregular Verbs: unregelmäßige Verben, contd.
Starke Verben (Verbs with Stem Vowel Change)



A number of German verbs undergo a change in the stem vowel in the present tense.
This only affects the second-person singular (DU) form and the third-person singular (ER, SIE, ES)
forms. The other forms (ich, wir, ihr, Sie) act just like regular verbs, and in every person, the endings
remain the same as for regular verbs.
You cannot automatically know by seeing an infinitive (e.g. ‘sehen’); you’ll need to memorize which
verbs belong to this class.
1. Vowel change from e › i
ich
du
er/sie/es
geben (to give)
gebe
wir
gibst
ihr
gibt
sie/Sie
geben
gebt
geben
ich
du
er/sie/es
nehmen (to take)
nehme
wir
nimmst
ihr
nimmt
sie/Sie
nehmen
nehmt
nehmen
Verbs you need to know that follow this pattern (e › i) are:
essen, geben, nehmen, sprechen, and treffen.
Other verbs that you may encounter include:
brechen (to break), helfen (to help), sterben (to die), werfen (to throw).
2. Vowel change from e › ie
sehen (to see)
ich
sehe
wir
sehen
du
siehst
ihr
seht
er/sie/es sieht
sie/Sie sehen
lesen (to read)
ich
lese
wir
lesen
du
liest
ihr
lest
er/sie/es liest
sie/Sie lesen
Verbs you need to know that follow this pattern (e › ie) are:
lesen and sehen (and its associated form fernsehen).
Other verbs that you may encounter include:
empfehlen (to recommend), geschehen (to happen), stehlen (to steal).
3. Vowel change from a › ä
fahren (to drive)
ich
fahre
wir
fahren
du
fährst
ihr
fahrt
er/sie/es fährt
sie/Sie fahren
laufen (to run)
ich
laufe
wir
laufen
du
läufst
ihr
lauft
er/sie/es läuft
sie/Sie laufen
Verbs you need to know that follow this pattern (a › ä) are:
anfangen, einladen, fahren, laufen, schlafen and tragen.
Other verbs that you may encounter include:
backen (to bake), fallen (to fall), lassen (to leave, to let), schlagen (to hit), waschen (to wash).
Grammatikunterricht
Verben mit trennbaren Vorsilben (Verbs with Separable Prefixes)
As you know, German verbs can have separable prefixes. (anhaben)
1. These prefixes change the meaning of the original verb, and make a new word. (anhaben ≠ haben)
2. In the present tense, separable prefixes are separated from the verb and placed at the end of the
sentence.
(Ich habe ein T-Shirt an)
3. The dictionary form, or infinitive, (i.e. anhaben) is not divided, and when you use a helping (modal)
verb (i.e. können) the verb will be at the end and not divided.
Hans hat jeden Tag Jeans an.
Hans wears Jeans every day.
Hans, hab einen Anzug an!
Hans, wear a suit!
Im Winter muss Hans einen Mantel anhaben. Hans has to wear a coat in the winter.
These are the verbs with separable prefixes you need to study!!
anfangen to begin, start
anhaben to have on, wear
anrufen to call (on the phone)
aufmachen to open
einkaufen to shop
einladen to invite
fernsehen to watch television
herkommen to come here
losgehen to start
mitbringen to bring along
mitkommen to come along`
rüberkommen to come over
vorhaben to plan
vorschlagen to suggest
Which of these verbs are strong verbs? What categories do they belong to?
1. anfangen (fängt an, category 3)
2. einladen (lädt ein, category 3)
3. fernsehen (sieht fern, category 2)
4. vorschlagen (schlägt vor, category 3)
Write sentences incorporating the words below.
1. Du rufst mich an.
2. Matthias darf mitkommen.
3. Tina schlägt eine Party vor.
4. Das Lacrossespiel geht um drei Uhr los.
5. Wir kaufen im Geschäft ein.
9
Grammatikunterricht
10
Irregular Verbs: unregelmäßige Verben, contd.
Present Perfect Tense (Irregular Verbs)
The irregular verbs, as the term suggests, do not follow the same pattern when forming the
past participle as the regular verbs. Some of these verbs use sein instead of haben. Therefore,
you must learn each past participle individually.
Hast du mit Tanja gesprochen?
Sie ist nach Hause gefahren.
Have you spoken with Tanja?
She has driven home.
Verbs that use a form of sein must both (a) indicate motion or change of condition and (b) be
intransitive, that is, verbs that cannot have a direct object. This is true in cases like sein, gehen,
laufen, kommen, fahren, schwimmen, fliegen and bleiben. You will learn more like these!!
Hast du schon mit Andrea gesprochen?
Wir sind acht Stunden nach Europa geflogen.
Have you spoken already with Andrea?
We have flown for eight hours to Europe.
Here are the irregular forms for most of the verbs you have learned so far:
beginnen (to begin) begonnen
bekommen (to receive, get) bekommen
bleiben (to stay) ist geblieben
bringen (to bring) gebracht
einladen (to invite) eingeladen
einsteigen (to get in, board)
ist eingestiegen
essen (to eat) gegessen
fahren (to drive) ist gefahren
finden (to find) gefunden
fliegen (to fly) ist geflogen
geben (to give) gegeben
gefallen (to like) gefallen
gehen (to go) ist gegangen
haben (to have) gehabt
helfen (to help) geholfen
kennen (to know) gekannt
kommen (to come) ist gekommen
laufen (to run) ist gelaufen
lesen (to read) gelesen
liegen (to lie, be located) gelegen
nehmen (to take) genommen
scheinen (to shine) geschienen
schießen (to shoot) geschossen
schreiben (to write) geschrieben
schreien (to scream, yell) geschrien
schwimmen (to swim) ist geschwommen
sehen (to see) gesehen
sein (to be) ist gewesen
singen (to sing) gesungen
sitzen (to sit) gesessen
sprechen (to speak) gesprochen
stehen (to stand) gestanden
tragen (to carry) getragen
treffen (to meet) getroffen
trinken (to drink) getrunken
verlassen (to leave) verlassen
vorschlagen (to suggest) vorgeschlagen
wissen (to know) gewusst
Verbs with separable prefixes have the ge- as part of the participle.
Susi hat mich angerufen.
Susi has called me.
Wen habt ihr zur Party eingeladen?
Whom have you invited to the party?
Present Perfect Tense: Special Cases:
The past participle of regular verbs with inseparable prefixes (like be-) is simply the er, sie, es form of the present
tense. This is also true of verbs ending in -ieren. NOTE: Ich habe meine Freundin besucht.
Grammatikunterricht
11
Simple Past (Narrative Past) Tense of Verbs: Imperfekt, Präteritum
The narrative past tense is frequently used in narratives and stories.The past tense of regular
verbs has the following endings added to the stem of the verb (notice ich & er/sie/es ARE THE
SAME!)
ich sag-te
du sag-test
er sag-te
sie sag-te
es sag-te
wir sag-ten
ihr sag-tet
sie sag-ten
Sie sag-ten
Meine Lehrerin wohnte ein Jahr in Deutschland.
My teacher lived in Germany for one year.
When the stem of the verb ends in -t or -d, an -e- is inserted between the stem and the ending.
Die Karte kostete nur ein paar Euro.
The ticket cost just a few euros
REVIEW p. 67 in your text for a list of some regular verbs.
Irregular Verbs
The irregular verbs do not follow the pattern of the regular verbs above and must be learned
individually.To learn to use these verbs more easily you should study the first or the third
person singular of the past tense.This will give you the base form to which endings are added in
all other persons.
Here are these endings:
kommen
ich
kam
du
kam-st
er/sie/es kam
wir
kam-en
ihr
kam-t
Sie
kam-en
Viele Schüler kamen jeden Tag pünktlich.
Jens ging um sieben Uhr zur Schule.
Warum fuhrst du erst so spät in die Stadt?
gehen
ging
ging-st
ging
ging-en
ging-t
ging-en
fahren
fuhr
fuhr-st
fuhr
fuhr-en
fuhr-t
fuhr-en
Many students came on time every day.
Jens went to school at seven o’clock.
Why did you drive downtown so late?
To facilitate learning the correct use of the irregular verbs, you should always remember three
forms: the infinitive, the past and the past participle.These forms are also called the “principal
parts”of a verb.The most frequently used irregular verbs, which you already know, are listed on
the next page. You will find the complete list of all irregular verbs in the “Grammar Summary”at
the end of the textbook. Only the basic forms (without prefixes) of the more commonly used
verbs are listed.
Grammatikunterricht
ei, ie, ie
ei, i, i
ie, o, o
i, a, u
i, a, o
e, a, o
e, a, e
i, a, e
a, u, a
a, ie, a
u, ie, u
Irregular
Mixed
Simple Past (Narrative Past) Tense of Verbs: Imperfekt, Präteritum
INFINITIVE
IMPERFECT
PAST PARTICIPLE
MEANING
bleiben
blieb
ist geblieben
to stay
schreiben
schrieb
geschrieben
to write
steigen
stieg
ist gestiegen
to climb
scheinen
schien
geschienen
to shine
schreien
schrie
geschrien
to scream, yell
schneiden
schnitt
geschnitten
to cut
fliegen
flog
ist geflogen
to fly
schießen
schoss
geschossen
to shoot
finden
fand
gefunden
to find
singen
sang
gesungen
to sing
trinken
trank
getrunken
to drink
beginnen
begann
begonnen
to begin
gewinnen
gewann
gewonnen
to win
schwimmen
schwamm
ist geschwommen
to swim
helfen
half
geholfen
to help
nehmen
nahm
genommen
to take
sprechen
sprach
gesprochen
to speak
treffen
traf
getroffen
to meet
essen
aß
gegessen
to eat
geben
gab
gegeben
to give
lesen
las
gelesen
to read
sehen
sah
gesehen
to see
sitzen
saß
gesessen
to sit
liegen
lag
gelegen
to lie, be located
fahren
fuhr
ist gefahren
to drive
schlagen
schlug
geschlagen
to beat, hit
tragen
trug
getragen
to carry
waschen
wusch
gewaschen
to wash
gefallen
gefiel
gefallen
to like
laufen
lief
ist gelaufen
to run
verlassen
verließ
verlassen
to leave
rufen
rief
gerufen
to call
gehen
ging
ist gegangen
to go
kommen
kam
ist gekommen
to come
sein
war
ist gewesen
to be
stehen
stand
gestanden
to stand
verstehen
verstand
verstanden
to understand
tun
tat
getan
to do
werden
wurde
ist geworden
to become, be
haben
hatte
gehabt
to have
kennen
kannte
gekannt
to know
wissen
wusste
gewusst
to know
bringen
brachte
gebracht
to bring
12
Grammatikunterricht
Wie kommst du dorthin? (How are you getting there?)



Ich komme mit dem Bus zur Schule.
Ich komme mit dem Rad zu meinem Freund.
Ich komme mit der Straßenbahn in die Stadt.
Did you notice that you change die to der?
Did you notice that you change das or der to dem?
Change die to der after mit or zu!
Change das/der to dem after mit or zu!
zum = zu dem
zur = zu der
German has 2 words for “to” that sometimes confuse students.
zu or nach

Use nach if you are going to another city, state, country or continent.

Use zu if you are going most anywhere else.
Note: Ich gehe in die Stadt. Ich fahre in die Schweiz/Türkei/Karibik.
An important exception…
13
Grammatikunterricht
zu/nach Hause
Zu Hause means “at home” (location) and nach Hause means “(going) home” (motion).

A key verb to help you remember nach Hause is gehen

A key verb to help you remember zu Hause is sein

Note that if you want to say "to my house/place" in German, you say zu mir
dative pronoun) and the word Haus is not used at all!

Note that if you want to say "at my house/place" in German, you say bei mir (bei +
dative pronoun) and the word Haus is not used at all!
Wo ist Heidi?
Sie ist zu Hause.
Where is Heidi?
She is at home.
Wohin geht Uwe?
Er geht nach Hause.
Where is Uwe going?
He is going home.
Kommst du später zu mir rüber?
Nein, am Abend ist mein Cousin bei mir.
Are you coming over later to my place?
No, my cousin will be at our house tonight.
Sind sie zu Hause oder gehen sie nach Hause?
Complete the following sentences using the words zu or nach.
1. Ist Werner zu
Hause?
2. Um wie viel Uhr kommst du
3. Ich höre gern CDs zu
nach
Hause?
Hause.
4. Später spielen wir Karten zu
Hause.
5. Wir gehen gleich
nach
Hause.
6. Gehst du jetzt
nach
Hause?
7. Heike ist heute schon um drei Uhr
8. Frau Schubert ist
zu
zu
Hause am Telefon.
9. Mein Hund wohnt bei mir zu
10. Ich muss nach Hause.
(zu +
Hause.
Hause.
14
Grammatikunterricht
15
Nominative and Accusative Case (Kasus: Nominativ und Akkusativ)
What is the subject of a sentence?
The subject of a sentence is the person or thing that is “doing” the verb. To find the subject,
look for the verb and ask “Who or what is doing?” (substitute the verb for “doing” -- Who or
what is singing? Who or what is sleeping?) Subjects are always in the NOMINATIVE CASE.
What is the direct object of a sentence?
The direct object receives the action of the verb. To find the direct object, look for the verb and
ask “Who or what is being verbed?” (as in Who or what is being kicked? Who or what is being
read?) Direct objects take the ACCUSATIVE CASE.
1. The Definite Article = THE (changing der to den)
Kaufst du den Bleistift?
Are you buying the pencil?
Brauchst du den Kuli?
Do you need the pen?
In the questions above, du is the subject (nominative), kaufst/brauchst the verb and
den Bleistift / den Kuli the direct object (accusative) of the sentence.
Compare the statements below:
Ich höre die Musik.
I am listening to the music.
ich is the subject (nominative), höre the verb and die Musik the direct object (accusative).
Wir lesen das Buch.
We are reading the book.
wir is the subject (nominative), lesen the verb and das Buch the direct object (accusative).
Some English Examples:
The woman sees the girl.
The woman is the subject and is nominative.
the girl is the direct object and is accusative.
The girl sees the woman.
The girl is the subject and is nominative.
the woman is the direct object and is accusative.
My brother is David.
my brother is the subject and is nominative.
David is ALSO nominative because it follows “to be” (is).
2. The Indefinite Article = A/An (changing ein to einen)
In English the articles “the”, “a” and “an” do not change depending on whether the
noun is accusative or nominative. (Only pronouns change case in English: compare “She sees
me” and “I see her”.)
In German not only the personal pronouns but also many other words change their form
based on case. The articles (der, ein, kein, etc.), possessive adjectives (mein, dein, etc.), and a
few (unusual) nouns all change their form (usually by adding or changing endings) depending on
what case they are in. Right now we’ll be dealing mostly with the definite articles (der/die/das)
and the indefinite articles (ein/eine); the table on the next page shows how they change in the
accusative case:
Grammatikunterricht
16
Nominative and Accusative Case (Kasus: Nominativ und Akkusativ), contd.
Nominative
Definite
Indefinite
Masc. Der Tisch ist braun.
Das ist ein Tisch.
Fem. Die Landkarte ist neu.
Das ist eine Landkarte.
Neut. Das Buch ist offen.
Das ist ein Buch.
Plural Die Bücher sind interessant. Das sind keine Bücher.
All of the nouns above are in the nominative case because they are the subjects of the
sentences or because they follow the verb “sein.”
Accusative
Definite
Masc. Ich sehe den Tisch.
Fem. Ich sehe die Landkarte.
Neut. Ich sehe das Buch.
Plural Ich sehe die Bücher.
Indefinite
Ich habe einen Tisch.
Ich habe eine Landkarte.
Ich habe ein Buch.
Ich habe keine Bücher.
The nouns above are all in the accusative case because they are direct objects.
To summarize in a few words:
Nominative case is used:
Accusative case is used:
- for the subjects of sentences
- for direct objects
- after any form of the verb “to be” - after accusative prepositions
A. Practice. Circle all nouns in the nominative, and underline all nouns in the accusative.
1. I meet them on Tuesday.
2. They invited me.
3. Paul hit the ball.
4. Martin and Petra like to read.
5. Have you seen a Shakespeare play?
6. He plays the piano.
7. “The Lives of Others” is a German movie.
8. I’m sleeping.
9. Is that a Mercedes?
10. He owns a house and a car.
B. Auf Deutsch. Now practice identifying subjects and objects in these German sentences.
1. Er hat ein Buch.
2. Ich trinke Kaffee.
3. Martin und Georg kaufen viele CDs.
4. Peter hat den Bleistift.
5. Herr Schmidt trinkt eine Cola und ein Glas
Subjekt = er
Objekt =ein Buch
Subjekt = ich
Objekt =Kaffee
6. Meine Großeltern sprechen deutsch.
Subjekt = meine Großeltern Objekt =deutsch
Subjekt = Martin und Georg Objekt =viele CDs
Subjekt = Peter
Objekt =den Bleistift
Subjekt = Herr Schmidt
Objekt =eine Cola und ein Glas Wasser
Wasser.
Grammatikunterricht
17
Nominative and Accusative Case (Kasus: Nominativ und Akkusativ), contd.
C. Sie sind dran. It’s your turn! Now that you’ve had some practice recognizing forms, what
about writing them yourselves? Fill in the blanks with the correct form of the articles in
parentheses. First, figure out what word is subject and what is object; then think about what the
right form is.
Fill in the correct DEFINITE article (der/die/das/den).
1. Der Vater findet die Tür nicht.
2. Die Lehrerin schreibt den Brief (=letter, m).
3. Hat der Bruder das Buch?
4. Er hat das Buch und den Bleistift.
5. Die Frau kauft den Kuli, die Landkarte und das Telefon.
6. Das ist der Mann!
7. Ich sehe das Buch, die Tür und das Lineal auf dem Tisch.
8. Das Klassenzimmer (n.) ist sehr groß.
9. Die Bücher sind klein.
10. Wo sind die Kinder (pl)?
11. Wo ist der Tisch?
12. Ich sehe den Tisch.
13. Wir hören die Schülerinnen (pl).
14. Die Mutter lernt englisch.
15. Herr und Frau Schmidt verstehen den Sohn und die Tochter nicht.
Fill in the correct INDEFINITE article (ein/eine/einen).
1. Ein Mann kommt ins Klassenzimmer.
2. Hast du einen Bruder oder eine Schwester?
3. Ein Stuhl ist kaputt.
4. Hast du einen Stuhl?
5. Ich suche einen Stuhl und eine Schultasche.
6. Meine Schwester und ich sehen einen Freund und eine Freundin in der Schule.
7. Heute kommt ein Cousin von mir (=of mine).
8. Eine Schülerin heißt Karin und ein Schüler heißt Karl.
Fill in the correct form of kein.
1. Das ist kein Mann -- das ist eine Frau!
2. Das ist kein Problem (n).
3. Wir haben keine Zeit (=time, f).
4. Hier ist keine Uhr.
5. Sie hat keine Tafel, keinen Stuhl und kein Buch.
Grammatikunterricht
Nominative and Accusative Case (Kasus: Nominativ und Akkusativ), contd.
der/die/das ODER den???
Find the gender of the word.
 Does the word take der?
 Does the word take die?
 Does the word take das?
der
die
das
Is the word
being “verbed”?
Is the word
doing the verb?
no change
change
der
den
ein/eine ODER einen???
Find the gender of the word.
 Does the word take der?
 Does the word take die?
 Does the word take das?
der
ein
Is the word
doing the verb?
die
das
eine
ein
Is the word
being “verbed”?
no change
ein
change
einen
18
Grammatikunterricht
19
Dative Case (der Dativfall)
He is coming by bike.
Er kommt mit dem Rad.
I am buying my friend a ticket.
Ich kaufe meinem Freund eine Karte.
The woman does not like the film. (= The film is not pleasing to the woman.)
Der Film gefällt der Frau nicht.
Did you notice how...?
1. das Rad became dem Rad
2. mein Freund became meinem Freund
3. die Frau became der Frau
That is the Dative Case! There are three reasons for using the dative case…
1. after a dative preposition
2. for the indirect object in a question or a sentence
3. after a dative verb
We will focus on Number One(= dative prepositions) first.
aus..........................out of, from
nach................................after, to
außer.................except for, besides seit................................since
bei........................at, near, with
von.................................from, by
mit..................................with
zu..................................to
One memory aid for these prepositions is to sing the Blue Danube Waltz melody with the
prepositions: aus-außer-bei-mit-nach-seit-von-zu.
Beispiele:
Sie haben ein Geschenk von ihrem Vater bekommen.
From their father.
Außer meiner Mutter spricht meine ganze Familie Deutsch. Except for my mother.
Ich fahre am Wochenende zu meiner Tante in Minnesota. To my aunt's.
Grammatikunterricht
20
Dative Case, continued
Two notes on using the dative with prepositions. First off, there are several contractions that
occur with dative prepositions. They are:
vom = von dem
zum = zu dem
beim = bei dem
zur = zu der
Also, as we have talked about, the preposition “in” often uses the dative case. Later you will be
learning more about this preposition and how to use it correctly. For now, the most you need
to know is that when ‘in’ is used with a stationary verb (e.g. He’s in the house), it takes the
dative case. Like the contractions above, im = in dem.
Der Tisch steht in der Küche.
Mein Schreibtisch ist im Arbeitszimmer.
Die Autos sind in den Garagen.
Where is it? In the kitchen.
Note that im = in dem
The cars are in the garages, plural.
SO HOW DOES THIS WORK?
der
die
das
dem
der
dem
die (pl.)
ein
eine ein
CHANGE IN THE DATIVE TO….
den +n
einem einer einem
keine (pl)
keinen +n
The only irregularity in the dative case: dative PLURAL forms add an -n to the noun if at all
possible. Consider:
den Freunden
(adds -n to plural form Freunde)
den Amerikanern
(adds -n to plural form Amerikaner)
den Leuten
(adds -n to plural form Leute)
mit
den Eltern
(already had an -n for plural, no second -n added)
den Frauen
(already had an -n for plural, no second -n added)
den Cousins
(had an -s for plural, but Cousinsn not possible!)
I
you
he
she
it
NOM
ich
du
er
sie
es
DAT
mir
dir
ihm
ihr
ihm
we
you all
they
You
NOM
wir
ihr
sie
Sie
DAT
uns
euch
ihnen
Ihnen
Grammatikunterricht
21
Dative Case, continued
A primary use of the dative case is for the indirect object of a sentence. An indirect object is the
beneficiary of whatever happens in a sentence. It’s usually a person, although it doesn’t have to
be. If you ask yourself: “TO whom or FOR whom is this being done?”, the answer will be the
indirect object, and in German it will need the dative case.
Not every sentence will have an indirect object -- Like in English, only some verbs allow an
indirect object: to give (to), to bring (to), to tell (to), to buy (for), to send (to) are some good
examples of verbs that will almost always have an indirect object. In English, we don't
distinguish the direct and indirect object in the forms of words; instead, we often use "to" or
"for" to mark these.
If you can potentially insert "to" or "for" in front of a noun in an English sentence, it's probably
an indirect object.
Ich gebe der Frau ein Buch.
Er schenkt mir ein Buch.
Ich habe das dem Mann schon gesagt.
Wir kaufen unserer Mutter ein Geschenk.
I’m giving her a book = a book to her.
He's giving me a book.
I already told the man that.
We're buying our mother a present.
Let’s practice identifying objects in some sentences first. Tell whether the underlined
nouns/pronouns in these sentences are SUBJECTS (S), DIRECT OBJECTS (DO), or INDIRECT
OBJECTS (IO).
1. The salesman offered the customer the car.
2. We’re bringing her the mail.
3. I lent my stereo to you.
4. He promised his wife everything.
5. The realtor sold the house to us.
6. For my dog, I’m buying a chew-toy.
Now do the same thing, but with these German sentences.
1. Ich gebe ihm ein Auto.
2. Die Schwester hat ihrem Lehrer die Antwort gesagt.
3. Der Sohn gibt seiner Mutter eine Blume.
4. Kannst du uns dein Auto leihen (=to lend)?
5. Euch gebe ich jetzt das Quiz.
6. Die Fotos habe ich meinen Freunden gezeigt (=showed).
Grammatikunterricht
22
Dative Case, continued
Verbs Followed by the Dative Case
There are a number of verbs in German that require the dative case. Contained in these
verbs is the idea of “TO OR FOR” (= INDIRECT OBJECT)
Here are some verbs that take the dative case:
gefallen to like, to be pleasing to
glauben to believe (to offer belief to)
helfen to help (to offer help to)
Leid tun to be sorry (for an offending action)
passen to fit, suit (to be the right size for)
schmecken to taste (to someone)
stehen to suit (to look good on)
wehtun to hurt (to be painful to)
Das Sweatshirt passt deiner Schwester sehr gut.
The sweatshirt fits your sister very well.
Kannst du deinem Vater helfen? Can you help your father?
Das tut mir Leid! I am sorry!
Remember that gefallen (gefällst, gefällt) and helfen (hilfst, hilft) are STRONG VERBS!!
Grammatikunterricht
23
Comparing adjectives and adverbs
To form the comparative for most adjectives or adverbs in German you simply add -er, as in
neu/neuer (new/newer) or klein/kleiner (small/smaller). For the superlative, English uses the
-est ending, the same as in German except that German often drops the e and usually adds an
adjective ending: (der) neueste (the newest) or (das) kleinste (the smallest).
Unlike English, however, German never uses "more" (mehr) with another modifier to form the
comparative. In English something may be "more beautiful" or someone could be "more
intelligent." But in German these are both expressed with the -er ending: schöner and
intelligenter.
German also has some irregular comparisons, just as English does. Sometimes these irregular
forms are quite similar to those in English. Compare, for instance, the English good/better/best
with the German gut/besser/am besten. On the other hand, high/higher/highest is
hoch/höher/am höchsten in German. But there are only a few of these irregular forms, and
they are easy to learn, as you can see below.
Irregular Adjective/Adverb Comparison
POSITIVE
COMPARATIVE
SUPERLATIVE
gern (gladly)
lieber (more gladly)
am liebsten (most gladly)
groß (big)
größer (bigger)
am größten (biggest)
der/die/das größte
gut (good)
besser (better)
am besten (best)
der/die/das beste
hoch (high)
höher (higher)
am höchsten (highest)
der/die/das höchste
nah (near)
näher (nearer)
am nächsten (nearest)
der/die/das nächste
viel (much)
mehr (more)
am meisten (most)
die meisten
When adjectives end in d, t, s, ß, sch, st, x or z, the ending in the superlative has an
additional e, with the exception of größer, am größten.
Die Rockmusik ist am interessantesten. The rock music is the most interesting.
Im Sommer ist es am heißesten.
It is the hottest during the summer.
Grammatikunterricht
24
Comparatives and Superlatives, contd.
There is one more irregularity that affects both the comparative and superlative of many
German adjectives and adverbs: the added umlaut ( ¨ ) over a, o, or u in most one-syllable
adjectives/adverbs. Below are some examples of this kind of comparison. Exceptions (do not
add an umlaut) include bunt (colorful), falsch (wrong), froh (happy), klar (clear), laut (loud), and
toll (great).
Irregular Comparison - Umlaut Added
POSITIVE
COMPARATIVE
SUPERLATIVE
dumm (dumb)
dümmer (dumber)
am dümmsten (dumbest)
der/die/das dümmste
kalt (cold)
kälter (colder)
am kältesten* (coldest)
der/die/das kälteste*
*Note the "connecting" e in the superlative: kälteste
klug (smart)
klüger (smarter)
am klügsten (smartest)
der/die/das klügste
lang (long)
länger (longer)
am längsten (longest)
der/die/das längste
stark (strong)
stärker (stronger)
am stärksten (strongest)
der/die/das stärkste
warm (warm)
wärmer (warmer)
am wärmsten (warmest)
der/die/das wärmste
In order to use the comparative forms above and to express relative comparisons or
equality/inequality ("as good as" or "not as tall as") in German, you also need to know the
following phrases and formulations using als, so-wie, or je-desto:



mehr/größer/besser als = more/bigger/better than
(nicht) so viel/groß/gut wie = (not) as much/big/good as
je größer desto besser = the bigger/taller the better
Grammatikunterricht
25
Comparatives and Superlatives, contd.
ENGLISH
DEUTSCH
My sister is not as tall as I am.
Meine Schwester ist nicht so groß wie ich.
His Audi is much more expensive than
my VW.
Sein Audi ist viel teurer als mein VW.
We prefer to travel by train.
Wir fahren lieber mit der Bahn.
Karl is the oldest.
Karl is oldest.
Karl ist der Älteste.
Karl ist am ältesten.
The more people, the better.
Je mehr Leute, desto besser.
He likes to play basketball, but most of
all he likes to play soccer.
Er spielt gern Basketball, aber am liebsten
spielt er Fußball.
The ICE [train] travels/goes the fastest.
Der ICE fährt am schnellsten.
Most people don't drive as fast as he
does.
Die meisten Leute fahren nicht so schnell
wie er.
Grammatikunterricht
26
German Word Order, When Subjects Are Not First: Wortstellung mit Zeitangaben
You’ve already learned many ways to express the time and day in German -- for instance,
‘am Freitag’ or ‘um 8 Uhr’. Let’s expand what you know by looking at some time expressions.
GERMAN TIME EXPRESSIONS= ZEITANGABEN
heute = today
diese Woche = this week
morgen = tomorrow
am Wochenende = on the weekend
gestern = yesterday
dieses Jahr = this year
übermorgen = the day after tomorrow nächstes Jahr = next year
heute Abend = this evening
vor einem Jahr = a year ago
diesen Freitag = this Friday
im Jahre 2008 = in the year 2008
VARIOUS UNITS OF TIME IN GERMAN= ZEITEINHEITEN
die Minute, -n = minute
die Woche, -n = week
die Stunde, -n = hour
das Wochenende, -n = weekend
der Tag, -e = day
der Monat, -e = month
die Nacht, -¨e = night
das Jahr, -e = year
Generally speaking, German sentences follow the rule of TIME-MANNER-PLACE (WANN-WIE-WO).
Time elements occur before manner elements (how you do something, e.g. by car, with friends,
happily), and the place or destination occurs last of the three.
This is different from English, so you’ll need to get used to saying the time before the place.
Also, general time (days) comes before specific time (2:00), which is the same as English (‘today
at 5:00’ = heute um 5 Uhr).
Susi kommt heute um 8 Uhr mit dem Bus in die Schule.
Lars kommt am Mittwoch um 2 Uhr mit seinen Freunden nach Hause.
German word order is slightly flexible: time elements can be moved to the front of the sentence. Unlike
English, there is NO COMMA used when a time element occurs first in a German sentence. Also,
remember that the conjugated VERB in a German sentence is NOT moveable, and needs to be the
SECOND element in the sentence. (An element can be comprised of more than one word, e.g. ‘heute
Morgen’ is one element.) When you start a sentence with something other than the subject, then the
subject must immediately follow the verb (e.g. Morgen gehe ich ...). As long as you keep the verb in
second position, and follow the secondary rule of time-manner-place, you can move many elements in a
sentence around.
Tina kommt heute Morgen mit ihren Eltern in die Schule.
Heute Morgen kommt Tina mit ihren Eltern in die Schule.
Grammatikunterricht
27
German Word Order, When Subjects Are Not First: Wortstellung mit Zeitangaben, contd.
So just to review:
VERB 2nd
TIME
MANNER PLACE
Sie
kommt
heute um 8 Uhr
Heute
kommt
sie
um 8 Uhr
Um 8 Uhr
kommt
sie
heute
mit dem
zur Schule.
Bus
mit dem
zur Schule.
Bus
mit dem
zur Schule.
Bus
(normal word order)
(normal word order, stressing
‘today’ slightly)
(unusual: this emphasizes ‘8:00’ as
important)
ALSO POSSIBLE:
Zur Schule kommt sie heute mit dem Bus um 8 Uhr. (unusual: this stresses “to school”)
Sei kreativ! Be creative! Let’s practice.
I. Create 4 sentences using the words below, beginning with the subject.
USE TIME-MANNER- PLACE (WANN-WIE-WO) AND ALWAYS PUT YOUR VERB 2nd!
SUBJEKT
WO?
was?
WANN?
WIE?
der Mann
meine Mutter
Harry Potter
die Lehrerin
die Band
im Klassenzimmer
im Café Julia
zu Hause
in dem Kaufhaus
auf einer Party
trinkt Kaffee
spielt Rugby
hört Musik
lernt spanisch
singt einen Song
am Freitag
im November
später
morgen
um 8 Uhr
schnell
zum Spaß (=for fun)
schlecht
gern
mit meinen Freunden
1.
2.
3.
4.
Meine Mutter trinkt Kaffee um 8 Uhr schnell zu Hause.
Harry Potter spielt Karten am Freitag mit meinen Freunden im Café Julia.
Der Mann lernt spanisch morgen schnell in dem Kaufhaus.
Die Lehrerin singt einen Song im November gern auf einer Party.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
Grammatikunterricht
28
German Word Order, When Subjects Are Not First: Wortstellung mit Zeitangaben, contd.
II. Create 4 sentences, beginning with words other than the subject. ALWAYS PUT YOUR
VERB 2nd! YOUR SUBJECT WILL FOLLOW THE VERB.
1.
2.
3.
4.
SUBJEKT
WO?
was?
WANN?
der Mann
meine Mutter
Harry Potter
die Lehrerin
die Band
im Klassenzimmer
im Café Julia
zu Hause
in dem Kaufhaus
auf einer Party
trinkt Kaffee
spielt Rugby
hört Musik
lernt spanisch
singt einen Song
am Freitag
im November
später
morgen
um 8 Uhr
Um 8 Uhr trinkt meine Mutter Kaffee zu Hause.
Am Freitag spielt Harry Potter Karten im Café Julia.
Morgen lernt der Mann spanisch in dem Kaufhaus.
Auf einer Party singt die Lehrerin einen Song gern.
CLOSING THOUGHTS
Where does the verb go in a German sentence?
It is always in the second place.
How is German word order different than English?
It follows stricter rules: verb 2nd , time-manner-place (WANN-WIE-WO).
It is more flexible than English: sentences can often start with words other
than the subject.
Grammatikunterricht
29
die Pronomen: German Pronouns
You have already learned the accusative case with definite and indefinite articles (den, einen).
You have also learned personal pronouns in the nominative case (ich, du, er, etc). Now it’s
time to learn the same pronouns in the accusative case. They are:
NOM
ENG
AKK
ENG
NOM
ENG
AKK
ENG
ich
I
mich
me
wir
we
uns
us
du
you
dich
you
ihr
y’all
euch
you all
er
he
ihn
him
sie
they
sie
them
sie
she
sie
her
Sie
You (f.)
Sie
You (f.)
es
it
es
it
 the pronouns for ‘me’ (mich) and ‘us’ (uns) are very much like English, so they shouldn’t
be a problem.
 The pronouns for ‘him’, ‘her’, ‘it’ and ‘them’ follow the same pattern as the articles:
 der (er) becomes den (ihn);
 die (sie) stays die (sie),
 and das (es) stays das (es).
That leaves the plural you form (ihr - euch), which you’ll just need to memorize!
When to use the accusative case, as a reminder: direct objects in a sentence must be in the
accusative case.
Siehst du den Mann? -- Ja, ich sehe ihn.
Hast du das Buch?
-- Ja, ich habe es.
Kennst du mich?
-- Ja, ich kenne dich.
Note: please do not confuse these pronouns with the possessive adjectives (his, her, my, your) that we just
learned. Those words (mein, dein, sein) are just like the article ein: (m)eine Mutter. The accusative pronouns,
however, stand alone as a substitute for a noun, just like in English: I see them = Ich sehe sie.
Grammatikunterricht
30
die Pronomen: German Pronouns
A. Decide whether the underlined pronoun is in the nominative or accusative case.
1. Michael fragt ihn. (AKK )
2. Kennst du sie? (AKK )
3. Sie hat es. ( NOM)
4. Er hat sie gern. (AKK )
5. Wer spielt es? (AKK )
6. Wann fängt es an? ( NOM) anfangen= to begin
7. Wo finde ich ihn? (AKK )
8. Sieht er sie? ( NOM)
B. Restate the sentences using a pronoun instead of the underlined noun. Write
the correct pronoun in the blank.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Wir hören es.
Ich sehe ihn.
Besucht ihr sie?
Ich frage sie.
Ich rufe sie an.
Ich höre ihn.
Er hat es.
Hast du ihn?
anrufen=to call on the phone
C. Provide the pronouns for the underlined nouns in the answering statement.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Ja, wir sehen ihn.
Ja, ich möchte ihn fragen.
Nein, wir verstehen sie nicht.
Dort ist sie!
D. Supply the proper personal pronoun in German for those in parentheses.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Kann ich Sie etwas fragen, Herr Peters?
Wir sehen sie im Klassenzimmer.
Kennt ihr ihn nicht?
Warum könnt ihr mich nicht verstehen?
Fragen Sie uns bitte!
Ich kann dich/Sie schon sehen, Jörg.
Sie besucht euch bald, Petra und Andrea.
Grammatikunterricht
Reflexive Verben: Reflexive Verbs
Ich freue mich auf die Reise.
I’m looking forward to the trip. (sich freuen auf= to look forward to)
Wir müssen uns beeilen.
We’ll have to hurry. (sich beeilen= to hurry)
In German, reflexive verbs are usually identified (in a dictionary) by the reflexive
pronoun sich preceding the infinitive form. Contrary to English verbs, many German
verbs are always used with a reflexive pronoun and, therefore, are called “reflexive
verbs.” The reflexive pronoun sich is similar to the English “oneself.”
Did you notice that you will change the word sich to words like mich (if you are talking
about “myself”) and uns (if you are talking about “ourselves”)?
The reflexive pronoun refers to a person who is both the subject and the object of the
sentence.
Compare the following:
Ich wasche das Auto.
Ich wasche mich.
NOT REFLEXIVE: I’m washing the car.
REFLEXIVE: I’m washing myself.
Here are the reflexive verbs you have learned/are learning so far:
sich ansehen*1 to look at
sich beeilen to hurry
sich duschen to shower, take a shower
sich freuen auf to look forward to
sich kämmen to comb one’s hair
sich putzen to clean oneself
sich rasieren to shave oneself
sich setzen to sit down
sich treffen* to meet
sich vorbereiten1 to prepare
sich waschen* to wash oneself
* STRONG VERB
1 SEPERABLE PREFIX VERB
Übersetze ins Deutsche (translate into German):
1. Erika is hurrying up today. = Erika beeilt sich heute.
2. Thomas is looking at the map. = Thomas sieht sich die Landkarte an.
3. Angelika is meeting with friends. =Angelika trifft sich mit Freunden.
31
Grammatikunterricht
32
Reflexivpronomen: Reflexive Pronouns
When a reflexive pronoun is used as a direct object, it appears in the accusative case.
sich kämmen
ich
kämme mich
du
kämmst dich
er/sie/es kämmt sich
wir
kämmen uns
ihr
kämmt euch
sie (pl)
kämmen sich
Sie
kämmen sich
sich waschen
wasche mich
wäschst dich
wäscht sich
waschen uns
wascht euch
waschen sich
waschen sich
The reflexive pronoun appears in the dative case when it functions as an indirect object. The
dative reflexive pronoun refers to both the subject and the indirect object of the sentence.
Quite often, the direct object is a body part or piece of clothing that belongs to the subject.
sich kämmen to comb one’s own hair
Ich kämme mir die Haare. I’m combing my hair.
sich putzen to clean oneself
Ich putze mir die Zähne. I’m brushing (cleaning) my teeth.
When you’re trying to decide whether to use an accusative or dative reflexive pronoun, look at
the sentence and determine if there is another element (such as a body part) that is acting as
the direct object. If so, then the reflexive pronoun will be dative (the indirect object).
Otherwise, if there is no other element in the sentence, the reflexive pronoun must be
accusative.
The following is a chart of the accusative and dative reflexive pronouns in German. Notice that
for the most part, these pronouns are the same as the object pronouns (dich, uns, etc.). Only
the third-person forms (sich) are new to you. Also notice that the only differences between
dative and accusative forms are in the first (mich-mir) and second (du-dir) singular persons.
NOM
AKK
ich........... mich.......... mir
du........... dich........... dir
er............ sich........... sich
sie........... sich........... sich
es............ sich........... sich
DAT
NOM
AKK
wir............ uns.............. uns
ihr............ euch............ euch
sie............ sich............. sich
Sie............ sich............. sich
DAT
Grammatikunterricht
33
Die Pronomen und die Fälle: German Pronouns and Cases
Ich habe einen neuen Computer.
I have a new computer.
Ja? Wo hast du ihn gekauft?
Yeah? Where did you buy it?
Wer ist das?
Sophies Sohn. Ihn kennst du nicht?
Who is that?
Sophie’s son. Don’t you know him?
When "he" changes to "him" in English, that's exactly the same thing that happens when der changes to
den in German (and er changes to ihn). Note that German has many words for it.
Definite Articles (the)
Fall
Case
Männlich
Masculine
Weiblich
Feminine
Sächlich
Neuter
Mehrzahl
Plural
Nominativ (subject)
der
die
das
die
Akkusativ (dir. obj.)
den
die
das
die
Dativ (indir. obj.)
dem
der
dem
den +n
Genitiv (possess.)
des+s
der
des+s
der
Indefinite Articles (a/an)
Fall
Männlich
Weiblich
Sächlich
Mehrzahl
Nom
ein
eine
ein
keine
Akk
einen
eine
ein
keine
Dat
einem
einer
einem
keinen +n
Gen
eines+s
einer
eines+s
keiner
Third-Person Pronouns (er, sie, es)
Fall
Männlich
Weiblich
Sächlich
Mehrzahl
Nom
er
he
sie
she
es
it
sie
they
Akk
ihn
him
sie
her
es
it
sie
them
Dat
ihm
(to) him
ihr
(to) her
ihm
(to) it
ihnen
(to) them
Gen
sein
his
ihr
her
sein
its
ihre
their
Demonstrative Pronouns (der, die, denen)
Fall
Männlich
Weiblich
Sächlich
Mehrzahl
Nom
der
that one
die
that one
das
that one
die
these
Akk
den
that one
die
that one
das
that one
die
those
Dat
dem
(to) that
der
(to) that
dem
(to) that
denen
(to) them
Gen
dessen
of that
deren
of that
dessen
of that
deren
of them
Grammatikunterricht
Other Pronouns
Fall
Case
1. Person
sing.
1. Person
plur.
2. Person
sing.
2. Person
plur.
Nom
ich
I
wir
we
du
you
ihr
you
Akk
mich
me
uns
us
dich
you
euch
you
Dat
mir
(to) me
uns
(to) us
dir
(to) you
euch
(to) you
Gen*
(Poss.)
mein
my
unser
our
dein
your
euer
your
Interrogative "who" • Formal "you"
Fall
Case
Wer?
who?
2. Person
formal (sing. & plur.)
Nom
wer
Sie
Akk
wen
whom
Sie
you
Dat
wem
(to) whom
Ihnen
(to) you
Gen*
(Poss.)
wessen
whose
Ihr
your
Let’s work the cases! Translate into German.
Q: Where is my sleeping bag?
Wo ist mein Schlafsack?
A: I have not seen it!
Ich habe ihn nicht gesehen?
Q: To whom did you give the groceries?
Wem hast die Lebensmittel gegeben?
A: To our brother.
Zu unserem Bruder.
Q: She is bringing the computer.
Sie bringt den Computer.
A: Is it new?
Ist er neu?
Q: Is he going with his friends?
Geht er mit seinen Freunden?
A: No, he is staying in the restaurant.
Nein, er bleibt in dem Restaurant.
34
Grammatikunterricht
35
Word Order of Dative and Accusative Cases
Er zeigt dem Herbergsvater seine Mitgliedskarte.
Er zeigt ihm seine Mitgliedskarte.
Er zeigt sie dem Herbergsvater.
Er zeigt sie ihm.
1-The following word order should be familiar to you:
In a sentence containing both an indirect object noun (dat.) and a direct object noun (acc.), the indirect
object noun precedes the direct object noun.
Er zeigt
He shows
Indirect Object Noun
(dative)
dem Herbergsvater
(to) the hostel director
Direct Object Noun
(accusative)
seine Mitgliedskarte.
his membership card.
.
2-Let’s use a pronoun to substitute for dem Herbergsvater.
When the indirect object or the direct object appears as a pronoun, the pronoun precedes the noun
object.
Er zeigt
He shows
Ind. Obj. Pronoun (dative)
Dir. Obj. Noun (acc.)
ihm
(to) him
seine Mitgliedskarte.
his membership card.
3-Now let’s use a pronoun to substitute for seine Mitgliedskarte.
Er zeigt
He shows
Dir. Obj.Pronoun (acc)
sie
it
Ind. Ob. Noun (dative)
dem Herbergsvater
(to) the hostel director
3-Finally, let’s pronouns to substitute for ihm AND seine Mitgliedskarte.
Er zeigt
He shows
Dir. Obj.Pronoun (acc)
sie
it
Ind. Ob. Noun (dative)
ihm
(to) him
A helpful hint: If the direct object is a noun, it is second. If the direct object is a pronoun, it is first.
Grammatikunterricht
36
Der Genitiv (The Genitive Case)
The genitive case is used in German to express either:
• possession, ownership, belonging to or with:
Hier ist das Auto meines Vaters.
Hast du die Freunde meiner Schwester gesehen?
Here is my father’s car.
Did you see my sister’s friends?
• “of” in English, when referring to a part or component of something else:
Am Anfang des Jahres haben wir viel gelernt.
Der Titel des Buches ist Der Zauberberg.
We learned a lot at the beginning of the year.
The title of the book ist Der Zauberberg.
• in addition, there are a handful of prepositions that require the genitive case:
anstatt (statt) -- instead of:
Anstatt eines Wagens haben sie ein Motorrad gekauft. Instead of a car they bought a motorcycle.
trotz -- in spite of:
Ich gehe zur Party trotz meiner Erkältung.
I’m going to the party in spite of my cold.
während -- during, in the course of:
Während der Party haben wir viel gegessen.
During the party we ate a lot.
wegen -- because of:
Wir sind wegen des Wetters zu Hause geblieben.
We stayed at home because of the weather.
Remember RESE NESE MRMN? This is a new line: SRSR (= des der des der)
The genitive case is unusual in German because it adds an ending not only to the articles, but to masculine
and neuter nouns as well. This ending is -es for single-syllable masculine and neuter nouns. When the noun is
more than one syllable long, the ending is usually just -s.
masc
des Mannes
meines Mannes
neut
des Buches
meines Buches
fem
der Frau
meiner Frau
pl
der Blumen
meiner Blumen
In addition, you may see the question word wessen: this is merely the genitive form of wer, and means
“whose”. It never has any other form or endings:
Wessen Auto ist das?
Whose car is that?
Wessen Bücher liegen hier?
Whose books are lying here?
Remember that with personal names, you can simply add an -s to indicate the possessive (Heidis Freund,
Ingos Katze, etc.)
Grammatikunterricht
37
Herunterladen
Explore flashcards